Monday, April 25, 2011

The Acquisitions Department

The workload is the same in any size and type of library.

Request forms

  • Many libraries have forms for suggested titles
    o Unit libraries will select material, the main library orders.
    o In special and academic libraries, 1 person specialises.
    o Journals are usually a separate department, dealing with vendors plans, developing expertise
  • May be print or online
  • Often includes area for acquisitions staff to fill out where they searched for item
  • Sometimes publishers flyers or catalogues are circulated amongst staff
Sample web-based request forms
Acquisitions work flow
Request forms can be standardized. Staff can write notes all over the form.
During the verification/duplication search, make sure the item exists. Make sure cataloguing records are correct. Check the library’s catalogue to avoid duplication. Will an older version suffice?
Chose a vendor - where will the purchase be from? How quickly is the material needed?
Have a well written electronic/paper form receiving and sending request. Allocate a budget code. Estimate a price.
Email/fax/mail the order form with payment
When the order record is filed, online files are automatically, or the most recent is at the top.
The process then repeats, albeit working it’s way back to the library.
When the order is received, the library should make sure that everything has arrived and deal with any missing items.
Library request form
Check the RRC Library request form http://library.rrc.ca/Services/Suggest-a-Purchase.aspx
Many libraries’ request forms differs. However, they want the same information. If a book has been advertised, libraries appreciate seeing the advertisement.
Libraries request as much of the following information as possible: the title, author(s), editor(s), publisher, publisher address, series title and number, edition, publication date, ISBN, title of book or journal or newspaper book was seen/reviewed in with the date and page number, number of copies requested, the estimated price per copy, the total cost, an explanation of why more than 3 copies are requested, a reason for multiple copies, a reason for the request, and how the person wishes to be contacted when the book is ready to be circulated. The library will ask for the name of the person requesting the book and where they are located and how they can be contacted. They will also sign and date the form.
The library then searches its catalogue and shelves for the book to see if they have it. They will note on the form if they have it, and its call number. If the item is not in the library, they will verify by a vendor (e.g. BIP, CBIP, BBIP, chapters.ca, Coutts, BNA, Login, or amazon.com) to find it. Whoever verifies the item initials the form. Someone will then authorize the purchase of the book. The form also has room for a fund# the material will be brought from, and a completion date.
In a manual library, more than one copy of a request form is needed.
Other duties
  • Gifts and exchanges
  • Depository program
    o The Canadian federal government insists on sending copies of their publications to certain libraries. Are you getting all the publications?
  • Track vendors’ performance
  • Compile statistics
    o Easy in automatic setting, time consuming in manual setting
  • Measure staff time spent
Acquisitions module
  • Not always available in automated systems
    o School libraries usually don’t have an acquisitions module, especially if they don’t acquire much materials. Excel can do the job, but unfortunately does not collaborate. 
  • Can save a lot of money
  • Average cost in staff time to order a single book is $10.85 with an acquisitions module, think how much it costs without
    o This cost was in the late 1990’s. Without the module, the price at least doubles.
Two major databases
In the acquisitions module
  • Vendor database
    o puts all information about a publisher in once unless contact information changes
    o assigns a code to represent information
    o orders can be sent out automatically
    o sub accounts can be created
  • Funds database
    o created anyway wanted
    o create library’s own codes and funds
    o computer creates eports for library tracking funds
    o good database will have a separate area for taxes
Model of an intergrated library system
Based on Figure 1.2 of Marshall Breeding. PC-Based Integrated Library Systems. (Westport, Conn. : Meckler, 1994)
Criteria for evaluating an acquisitions module
  • Ability to display order status in OPAC
    o can the module and OPAC be linked?
    o can ordered material not be shown to avoid public demand?
  • Generate purchase orders in both print and EDI formats
  • Vendor information database
  • Electronic ordering of materials
    o preference
    • Calculate overdue orders and generate claims
    • Manage funds
    • Produce reports
    • Calculate exchange rates
    • Allow a input of items of interest but not yet ordered
    • Password security

Monday, April 18, 2011

Current sources for In-Print Books

amazon.com / amazon.ca
Also known as Earth’s Largest Bookstore, this company emerged on the scene in the late 1990s and has already had a large impact on the way the general public and libraries purchase materials. You can search by subject, author or title and immediately see a list of recent titles available through amazon.com, sometimes with a guaranteed twenty-four hour response time. Reviews both editorial and by customers themselves are also accessible online when available.

Books in Print (BIP)
THE major listing of books published and distributed in the United States is Books in Print, more commonly referred to in the library world as BIP. It is produced by R.R. Bowker and comes in a variety of formats.

The print version is printed annually in August or September and is now eight volumes including author, title and publisher indexes to over 1.8 million active titles. The accompanying Subject Guide to Books in Print, referred to as SGBIP, (six volumes) is available as a separate subscription and provides subject access to non-fiction titles listed in BIP. To give you an idea of the size of this resource, there are approximately 29,000 pages in BIP and 16,000 pages in the Subject Guide. The print version sells for $769US for BIP and $525US for SGBIP.

Bowker also produces Paperback Books In Print, Forthcoming Books In Print and other special listings.

BIP is also available on CD-ROM and over the Internet. One of the advantages of acquiring the CD-ROM version is that you can subscribe to Books In Print with Book Reviews on Disc™. It includes over 30,000 full-text book reviews from major reviewing journals such as Library Journal, Publishers Weekly, School Library Journal, CHOICE, Booklist, Kirkus and Quill & Quire. This version sells for $2,075US for a yearly subscription. Another major advantage of subscribing to the CD-ROM version is that the library is able to initiate an order directly from the CD-ROM to either their vendor or directly to the publisher. This saves a great deal of staff time and paper involved in creating purchase orders.

Canadian libraries usually subscribe to either Bowker/Whitaker Global Books In Print on Disc™ or Books In Print on Disc Canadian Edition. The Global version includes all titles from BIP (US and Canada), Whitaker’s BookBank (UK), International Books in Print (Continental Europe, Africa, Asia, and Latin America) and Australian and New Zealand Books in Print. It is available on a 1 year subscription of $2,250 US and is updated monthly. The Canadian Edition comes with or without reviews and is available updated on a quarterly basis. The prices are: (without reviews) $1,650 US annually; (with reviews) $2,175US annually.

Canadian Books in Print (CBIP)
On a much smaller schedule is Canadian Books in Print, or CBIP, published by the University of Toronto Press. In contrast to BPIP, it is only two volumes, an author title listing and subject index. The 1999 version is only 1,300 pages long and costs under $150 CAN. It is published annually.

chapters.indigo.ca
Like amazon.com, chapters.indigio.ca provides Internet access to titles carried by the Canadian bookstore, Chapters. You can search by author, title, or subject and immediately be presented with a list of current titles available through Chapters.

Whitaker’s Books in Print; The Reference Catalogue of Current Literature
This is the British equivalent to BIP. Published annually, it comes in several volumes and costs £449, a paperback edition of the publisher directory is available separately for £25. All titles are available over the internet at the Internet Book Shop http://www.whsmith.co.uk/

Current review sources

Title: Booklist
Publisher: American Library Association
Frequency: 22 times per year
Price: $800.00 US
Intended audience: Public and school libraries
Description: Contains evaluative reviews. “For more than 90 years, Booklist magazine has been the librarian’s choice for reviews of the latest books and (more recently) electronic media. Every year we review nearly 4,000 books for adults, more than 2,500 titles for children, more than 500 reference books and electronic reference tools, and 1,000 other audiovisual materials. We also publish a wide variety of feature articles including author interviews, bibliographies, book-related essays by well-known writers, and a selection of columns”. From their website January 21, 2004.
Internet URL: http://www.ala.org/ala/aboutala/offices/publishing/booklist_publications/booklist/booklist.cfm  
Title: Books in Canada
Publisher: Toronto: Canadian Review of Books
Frequency: 9 issues per year
Price: $40CAN for institutions, $27.90CAN for individuals
Intended audience: General public
Description: Contains evaluative reviews. “We have Canada’s books wrapped up in one comprehensive review magazine. With more than 400 literary, intellectual and political books reviewed each year, along with essays and interviews with Canadian authors, this award-winning magazine aims to provide both a service for book readers and a forum for a range of opinions…” From the Canadian Magazines Publishers Association web site. http://www.magomania.com/search/mag_1.epl?id=64 January 21, 2004
Internet URL: http://www.booksincanada.com/  

Title: The Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books
Publisher: Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois
Frequency: Monthly, except for August
Price: Individuals: $50 US, Institutions: $60 +$7US for shipping outside of the United States
Intended audience: Public and school libraries
Description: “The Bulletin, founded in 1945, is devoted entirely to the review of current books for children. It provides concise summaries and critical evaluations to help you find the books you need. Each review gives you information on book’s content, reading level, strengths and weaknesses, and quality of format, as well as suggestions for curricular use. Most books are reviewed from publisher’s galley proofs. With this up-to-date coverage, you’ll know which books to buy the moment they’re available. Bulletin Blue Ribbons … provides an annual selection of the year’s most distinguished books.” From their website January 22, 2004
Internet URL: http://bccb.lis.illinois.edu/


Title: Canadian Book Review Annual
Publisher: Joyce M. Wilson, Publisher
Frequency: May each year
Price: $120 CAN
Intended audience: All types of libraries
Description: “The Canadian Book Review Annual presents original 200- to 400-word reviews of the English-language trade, scholarly, and reference books that are published in Canada each year, and that are written by Canadians or those residing in Canada … In general, the following guidelines have been observed by the CBRA reviewers: a description of the book’s contents and brief information about the author usually precede critical commentary; emphasis is on analysis and evaluation … All reviewers—some 300 subject specialists across Canada—are identified in a list of contributors.” From http://www.interlog.com/~cbra/CBRA.html January 22, 2004
Internet URL: None


Title: CHOICE
Publisher: American Library Association, Association of College and Research Libraries
Frequency: Monthly (July/August combined)
Price: See below
Intended audience: Academic, research and special libraries, some public and high school may refer to it for college level materials
Description: “Choice magazine has been one of America’s leading review journals since 1964. Each year, Choice reviews more than 6,500 new books and electronic media in more than 50 disciplines spanning the humanities, science and technology, and the social and behavioral sciences … Choice magazine is published 11 times a year (monthly except for a combined July/August issue). Each regular issue of the magazine contains approximately 600 of Choice’s highly acclaimed reviews. Most issues also contain at least one special feature compiled by the Choice editors and a bibliographic essay … A subscription to Choice Magazine also includes a complimentary copy of Choice’s Special issue on the Web. Published each August, the Web Issue includes several special features and a compilation of recent Choice reviews of outstanding Web sites. The August 2002 Web Issue (Web VI) will contain more than 700 reviews of Web resources selected by the Choice editorial staff for their quality and relevance for academic and research libraries.” From their website: http://web.archive.org/web/20040213000252/http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlpubs/choice/howtosubscribe/choicemagazine/choicemagazine.htm
Internet URL: http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/publications/choice/choicereviewsonline/cro.cfm

Publication What it includes North America Pricing (US, Canada, Mexico) 
Choice magazine 11 regular issues of Choice magazine, including all special issues and supplements $270.00 
Choice Reviews on Cards (Available only to subscribers of Choice and/or ChoiceReviews.com) 11 regular sets of Choice Reviews on Cards (4.125" x 5.25" cards on 70lb paper)$360.00
ChoiceReviews.online Password EditionOne year of password access to Choice review database (90,000+ reviews) with customizable e-mail alert for up to 20 users$300.00 
Additional User Option ChoiceReviews.online Password EditionBlocks of 10 additional user passwords (if desired number of users exceeds 20)$135.00 
ChoiceReviews.online Site License Edition One year of IP-based access to Choice review database (90,000+ reviews) for one (1) simultaneous user$300.00 
Additional User Option ChoiceReviews.online Site License EditionFee for each additional simultaneous user$135.00 
Choice SelectA subscription to 4 of the most popular issues: November (Reference), January (OAT list), April (Electronic Media), August (Special Issue)$115.00 

Title: CM: Canadian Review of Materials
Publisher: Manitoba Library Association
Frequency: Biweekly
Price: Available only on the Internet. Free access, but regular readers asked to contribute money as a charitable donation.
Intended audience: Anyone involved with and working with young people, children.
Description: “CM: Canadian Review of Materials is an electronic reviewing journal. We review Canadiana of interest to children and young adults, including publications produced in Canada, or published elsewhere but of interest or significance to Canada, such as those having a Canadian writer, illustrator or subject. We review books, video and audio recordings and CD-ROMS.” From their website, January 22, 2004.
Internet URL: http://www.umanitoba.ca/cm/


Title: Kirkus Reviews
Publisher: Kirkus Reviews
Frequency: Semi-monthly
Price: Print and Online Combination Subscription – 12 months - $450US
Print and Online Combination Subscription – 6 months - $250US
KirkusReviews.com – online access only – Month-to-Month subscription - $37.50US/month
Intended audience: Libraries and booksellers
Description: “Kirkus Reviews, founded in 1933, is published 24 times annually and reviews, two to three months pre-publication, approximately 5,000 titles – Fiction, Mystery, Science Fiction, Foreign Language, Non-Fiction and Children’s – per year. The reviews are reliable and authoritative, written by specialists selected for their knowledge and expertise in a particular field. KirkusReviews.com posts approximately 500 pre-publication books reviews each month. Both the magazine and Website are read – and depended on – by librarians, publishers, agents, booksellers, and the story departments of major movie and television studios. Not a few best-selling books and blockbuster movies have their success traced back to Kirkus. The full text reviews on our site include book title, author, review date, publisher, number of pages, price, publication date, ISBN and ISDN numbers.” From their web site January 22, 2004.
Reviews tend to be less evaluative than those in Library Journal, CHOICE and others.
Internet URL: http://www.kirkusreviews.com/kirkusreviews/index.jsp

Title: Library Journal
Publisher: Bowker
Frequency: 20 times per year
Price: $163US for Canadian libraries
Intended audience: Libraries serving adults
Description: “Library Journal, the oldest independent national library publication. Founded in 1876, this ‘bible’ if the library world is read by over 100,000 library directors, administrators, and others in public, academic, and special (e.g. business) libraries. Published 20 times annually, LJ combines news, features, and commentary with analyses of public policy, technology, and management developments. In addition, some 7,500 evaluative reviews written by librarians help readers make their purchasing decisions: reviews of everything from books, audio and video, CD-ROMS, websites, and magazines. Each issue reviews 250 to 300 adult books, mostly prior to publication, making it a source librarians as well as publishers turn to for early evaluations.” From their website: http://web.archive.org/web/20040201010935/http://libraryjournal.com/index.asp?layout=document&doc_id=18610&crumb=AboutUs
Internet URL: http://www.libraryjournal.com/


Title: Publishers Weekly
Publisher: Bowker
Frequency: 51 times a year
Price: $264US
Intended audience: Book publishing industry professionals
Description: “Publishers Weekly is the vehicle that draws the many elements of publishing into a community. It is the prime source of comprehensive news and provides unique industry data, including bestsellers by multiple categories, book industry statistics, news and more than 7,500 critical book and spoken-word audio and e-book reviews annually.” … Special issues include the Spring and Fall Adult Book Announcements (for round-ups of the seasons), Spring and Fall Children’s Book Announcements, and Multimedia Announcements. From their website: http://www.publishersweekly.com/article/423071-About_Publishers_Weekly.php January 22, 2004 Their reviews are more promotional reviews.
Internet URL: http://www.publishersweekly.com/

Title: Quill & Quire
Publisher: Key Publishers
Frequency: Monthly
Price: $64.15CAN
Intended audience: Professionals in book industry and librarians
Description: “Quill & Quire magazine, which each month includes reviews of more than 35 new Canadian books, news and feature articles about the book industry, book deals, author profiles, opinion columns, and bestseller lists. Inside Report, a twice-weekly PDF newsletter with breaking news stories about Canadian publishing sent to subscribers via e-mail. Canadian Publishers Directory, a semi-annual guide/ordering tool used by booksellers and librarians to determine which international book lines are carried in Canada and by whom. The Book Trade in Canada, an annual reference guide to the Canadian book industry that includes a comprehensive listing of publishers, booksellers, and government generating agencies and professional associations in Canada, a calendar of events, list of awards and courses, and more.” From their website: http://www.quillandquire.com/ January 22, 2004.
Internet URL: http://www.quillandquire.com/


Title: School Library Journal
Publisher: Bowker
Frequency: Monthly
Price: See $170US
Intended audience: Public and school libraries
Description: “School Library Journal, the print magazine, and now, School Library Journal Online, the web site, serve librarians who work with young people in schools and public libraries. The two publications give librarians indispensable information needed to manage libraries, from creating high-quality collections to understanding how technology can assist (or hinder) learning. School Library Journal, founded in 1954, carries more book reviews and wins more awards for editorial excellence than any other publication in the field.” From their website: http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/index.asp?layout=document&doc_id=18615&crumb=AboutUs January 22, 2004.
Internet URL: http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/

Title: Canadian Book Review Annual
Publisher: Joyce M. Wilson, Publisher
Frequency: May each year
Price: $120 CAN
Intended audience: All types of libraries
Description: “The Canadian Book Review Annual presents original 200- to 400-word reviews of the English-language trade, scholarly, and reference books that are published in Canada each year, and that are written by Canadians or those residing in Canada … In general, the following guidelines have been observed by the CBRA reviewers: a description of the book’s contents and brief information about the author usually precede critical commentary; emphasis is on analysis and evaluation … All reviewers—some 300 subject specialists across Canada—are identified in a list of contributors.” From http://www.interlog.com/~cbra/CBRA.html January 22, 2004
Internet URL: None


Title: CHOICE
Publisher: American Library Association, Association of College and Research Libraries
Frequency: Monthly (July/August combined)
Price: See below
Intended audience: Academic, research and special libraries, some public and high school may refer to it for college level materials
Description: “Choice magazine has been one of America’s leading review journals since 1964. Each year, Choice reviews more than 6,500 new books and electronic media in more than 50 disciplines spanning the humanities, science and technology, and the social and behavioral sciences … Choice magazine is published 11 times a year (monthly except for a combined July/August issue). Each regular issue of the magazine contains approximately 600 of Choice’s highly acclaimed reviews. Most issues also contain at least one special feature compiled by the Choice editors and a bibliographic essay … A subscription to Choice Magazine also includes a complimentary copy of Choice’s Special issue on the Web. Published each August, the Web Issue includes several special features and a compilation of recent Choice reviews of outstanding Web sites. The August 2002 Web Issue (Web VI) will contain more than 700 reviews of Web resources selected by the Choice editorial staff for their quality and relevance for academic and research libraries.” From their website: http://web.archive.org/web/20040213000252/http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlpubs/choice/howtosubscribe/choicemagazine/choicemagazine.htm
Internet URL: http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/publications/choice/choicereviewsonline/cro.cfm


Title: Teacher Librarian
Publisher: Bowker
Frequency: Monthly
Price: $49US
Intended audience: School library staff
Description: “Teacher Librarian, or TL as we’re often called, is designed specifically for you, the library professional working with children and young adults. Within our pages you’ll find lively and relevant articles exploring current issues such as collaboration, leadership, technology, advocacy, information literacy, and management. Regular sections include reviews of education and library-related professional materials, the best of new books for children and young adults, non-fiction, bestsellers, videos and computer software and Internet resources grouped by theme to spark your imagination.” From their website: http://www.teacherlibrarian.com/about_us/about.html January 22, 2004
Internet URL: http://www.teacherlibrarian.com/

Strengths and weaknesses of different types of selection aids 
Selection aid Strengths Weaknesses 
Current Sources for In-Print Books * Comprehensive
* Useful for verification 
* Go out of date quickly in print format
* May not contain reviews
* Many are expensive
Current Review Sources* Current
* Often written by subject specialists
* Readily available 
* May not relate directly to your library
* Represent only one person's opinion
Best Books, Recommended Lists and Core Collections * Help develop strong collections
* Easy to use
* Often American in content
* Date quickly
* May not suit your local needs
Publishers' Catalogues, Flyers and Announcements* Give advance notice of high demand titles* Promontional rather than evaluative 

Monday, April 11, 2011

Selection

Selection is the process of looking at books for the library collection.

Criteria for selection
  • For buying, is it suitable for the library?
    o Content
    o Physical format
    * Libraries want quality binding. In 2004 we asked ourselves how much longer would VHS be collected for? Do you want print or electronic formats?

  • Purpose, Scope and Audience
    o Look at reviews and publishers. Does the purpose match the clientele? Does it indicate the reading level? Is that a reading level suitable for the clientele?
  • Difficulty
    o Reading level
  • Authority, Honesty and Credibility of the author
    o Is the author well known? Are they an expert in their field? Are the reviews good?
  • Subject matter
    o Do a lot of people cite that author’s work? Does articles appear in periodicals? A re they quality researched books?
  • Comparison
    o Look at reviews of books the library already has on the subject. Does this book add anything to the field?
  • Timeliness
    o Big publications sell most of their copies within the first five years. Non-fiction publications are only valid within two years of publication for good information.
  • Accuracy
  • Impartiality
  • Literary merit
  • Arrangement and organization
  • Curriculum support
  • Demand
  • Local content


Physical format
  • Format
    o Does the format suit the purpose of the book, and for the user? E.g. language, on audio/video, and for seniors large type books and on tape/CD.
  • Binding
    o Patrons prefer paperbacks, so laminate the covers for protections. Those with ‘nice’ covers (perhaps illustrative, bright), are more popular than those with ‘boring’ covers. Try to avoid books with spiral/teeth binding, as these materials need to be repaired sooner rather than later, and often. 
  • Appearance
    o Hardcovers can look boring without their dust jackets, losing appeal.
  • Illustrations
    o Illustrations are important in both non-fiction and fiction books. Colour is more appealing, as are photographs over pictures. Are they appropriate?
  • Size
  • Price
  • Series
Selection aids
Resources that allow informed decisions
  • Current sources for in-print books
  • Catalogues, flyers, announcements
    o from publishers
  • Best books, recommended lists and core collections
  • Current review sources
    o Libraries rely on these aids heavily, check online regularly
  • Subject bibliographies
    o Specialities
  • National bibliographies
    o e.g. Canadiana, access over Amicus to access bibliographies worldwide
Current sources for in-print books
  • Books in Printo Forthcoming Books in Printo Paperback Books in Print* 8 printed volumes contain titles and authors. 5 volumes contain subject
    * volumes available in print, on CD or by Internet, all with or without reviews
    * Only relevant to U.S. titles
  • Canadian Books in Printo Huge 2 volume contain author, title and subject
  • Whitaker’s Books in Print (UK)
    o Available online
  • Cumulative Book Index (Wilson)
    o Reference only
Types of current review sources
  • Reviews for trade, professional booksellers and librarians
    o Promotional
    In Publishers Weekly. These are informative reviews wanting to sell the book, not evaluative, so won’t tell the whole truth
    o Evaluative
    * Will tell the truth about books, not always recommending them, similar to critical (slamming books, but wouldn’t say it’s not recommended)
  • Reviews for subject specialists (professional journal reviews)
    o ALA produces Booklist (public), Choice (academic)
    o School Library Journal (K-12)
    o Library Journal (Adults)
    * Some libraries use all three titles, especially large academic and public libraries. Lots of libraries will subscribe to at least the suitable publication.
  • Reviews for general public
    o In newspaper stands, yet deemed highly influence
  • Promotional review sources
    o Publisher’s Weekly
    * not always promotional, wants to help publisher sell
    o Kirkus Reviews
Evaluative review sources
  • Booklist
  • Books in Canadao reviews Canadian books
  • Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Bookso from Illinois library school graduates; highly respected
  • Choiceo academic break down by subject
    o highly critical
    o can base selection on reviews – if review is bad, the book is likely to be
  • CM Canadian Materialso http://umanitoba.ca/cm/
    o material has to be published in Canada before it is reviewed
    o highly respected
  • Horn Book
  • Library Journalo school libraries
  • School Library Journalo school libraries
Limitation of reviews
  • Most books are only reviewed once, if at all
    o take a closer look before buying
  • Time lag
    o some reviews aren’t written/published
    o some reviews aren’t available until after demand dies
  • Some sources only publish favorable reviews
  • Competence of Reviewers
Review sources for the general public
Major magazines and newspapers contain book reviews. These include Canada’s National Post.
  • Macleans
  • Newsweek
  • Time
  • Globe & Mail
  • New York Times Book Reviewo Weekly section reviewing high quality
  • Radio and TV shows
    o e.g. Oprah Winfrey
  • Times Literary Supplemento British version of New York Times Book Review
Finding out where a book has been reviewed
Often subscribe and look at websites monthly. Sources will help recommended reviews.
  • Book Review Digesto published monthly
    o includes review excerpts
    o non-fiction must be reviewed twice, fiction three, at least once in Canada
  • Book Review Indexo monthly reviews
    o citations only
  • Canadian Periodical Index
  • Canadian Book Review Annualo print
    o lists where books have been reviewed
  • CBCAo periodical/journal/book reviews
    o includes major Canadian books
  • EBSCOhost (and many others)
Some good internet sites
Online bookstores will also link to excellent review sources.


Best books, recommended lists etc.
  • Wilson catalogs
    o part of H.W. Wilson, their books are called ‘catalogs’
    o provides list of basic titles all libraries should have
    o They recommend American Best of Best
    o Libraries can use as a checklist
    o Hard volume published every 5 years
    o supplements also available
    o highly respected
    o provides cataloguing information
    * Children’s catalog
    * Fiction catalog
    * Public Library catalog
    * Middle and Junior High School Library catalog
    * Senior High School catalog
  • Brodart’s Elementary School Collection
    o pre-school to grade 6 titles
    o Dewey Decimal
  • Brandon-Hill lists
    o medical field
    o highly respected
    o several lists
    * medical
    * nursing
    * health sciences
Subject and national bibliographies
  • Bibliographie de France
  • British National Bibliography
  • Canadianao Canada
  • Deutsch Bibliolgraphieo German
  • Requires government documentations from the bibliographies
Publisher’s flyers, etc.
promotional
  • Catalogues
    o also available online
    o easier to circulate
    o lists tables of contents
  • Flyers
    o pre-publication flyers, sees how much interest is available before mass producing
    o e-mails new offers
    o lists tables of contents
  • Brochures
  • Web sites

Monday, April 4, 2011

Collection development & acquisitions: Publishing practices

Definition of a publisher

“A publisher supplies the capital and editorial assistance required
to transform manuscripts into books and electronic products.”

- G. Edwards Evans, Developing Library and Information Center Collection,
3rd ed. (Englewood, Colo., 1995) 159.


Functions of a publisher
  • Tap resources of materials
    o What could be published?
  • Raise and supply the capital to make books
  • Aid in the development of the manuscript
    o Are there any mistakes?
  • Contract for the manufacturing (printing and binding) of books
    o Subcontracts are available, get different parts from different contractors. Publisher helps out with other medium rights.
  • Distribute books, including promotion and advertising
  • Maintain records of sales, contracts, and correspondence relating to the production and sale of books
- G. Edwards Evans, Developing Library and Information Center Collection,
3rd ed. (Englewood, Colo., 1995) 159.

Types of publishers
  • Trade publishers o produce wide variety of materials, big sales to book stores, libraries and wholesalers
  • Specialty publishers
    o caters to specific markets – type, age group, etc. Academic libraries acquire most of their material here. Prices are higher.
  • Scholarly publishers
    o Subset, not for profit, care for research quality, may occasionally write for public, e.g. University of Toronto press.
  • Paperback publishers
    o 2 types:
    * Quality – lasts
    * Mass market – are not always made to last
    o If published first in paperback, they never came out in hard back because it’s less expensive. Paperbacks are more popular, they can be permabound if in high demand.
  • Vanity presses
    o Author pays for material to be published
  • Private presses
    o concerned about art work, expensive, take those books no longer under copyright. Libraries unlikely to buy, may research for historical purposes
  • Government presses
    o produces most publications on anything. local, national, international agencies produce statistics, which are important to have
  • Reprint publishers
    o specialize out-of-print materials, may reproduce on demand if they have the rights and the library need the materials
  • Serial publishers
    o produces magazines and journals
  • Associations
    o produce high quality specialties for customer benefits
Types of vendors
  • Publishers
    o may sell own material and distribute others’ publications
  • Wholesalers or Jobbers
    o buy in bulk and resale not in business to public. Libraries use them.
  • Agents or Dealers
    o may be publisher, all distribute other publishers’ work
  • Retailers
    o e.g. Chapters, primarily sell to general public. Can be online, focus on selling direct to customers.
Libraries can use more than one type of vendor.

What is a jobber?


“The jobber performs the role of a wholesaler of books and other library materials by trying to anticipate what its customers, usually schools, bookstores, and libraries, are going to buy and stocking those items in quantity in advance.”
Rose Mary Macgill and John Cobin. Acquisitions Management and Collection Development in Libraries, 2nd ed. (Chicago: American Library Association, 1989) 101-102.

Libraries receive a discount from publisher for buying in bulk, often between 50 and 60%. They sell to libraries with a 15-20% discount. Jobbers carry limited titles, usually North American publications.

Why libraries use jobbers
  • Often give 15-20% discounts
  • Only one order and invoice for many different publishers’ works
  • Value-added services
    o Free or inexpensive cataloguing copy
    * sends catalogue copy record to save money and time
    o Fully processed books
    * covers call numbers, tell them what to assign – you do the accession numbers
    o Online access to catalogues and ordering
    o Fast tunaround time guaranteed
Agents or dealers
  • Also purchase items for resale
  • Will often carry foreign publishers’ titles
  • Might limit their stock to a subject area or format of material
    o preferable for special libraries more than public and school libraries
  • Some specialize in out-of-print items
    o different from reprint items, some may specialize in rare books
  • Often will go extra mile to locate hard-to-find items
Retailers
  • rarely offer more than 10% off list price
    o compare to jobbers
  • selection may be limited
    o store limitations, buying trips are limited
  • can view before purchasing
  • if item in stock, extremely fast turnaround time if local bookstore
  • libraries use amazon.com or chapters.ca
    o good discounts and online reviews
    o by public, critic, marketing
Special libraries may use retailers for research purposes.

Advantages of publishers
  • Publisher most likely to have item in stock if still in print
    o Materials can go out of print very quickly. Publishers will print in demand.
  • More accurate in reporting out of print items
    o Contact if the jobber has trouble attaining materials
  • Send material more promptly than wholesaler
    o Wholesalers run out of material more quickly than publishers
Disadvantages of publishers
  • Many shipments and invoices from different publications
    o takes up time, costs money
  • Monitoring performances difficult if dealing with many vendors
Advantages of jobbers
  • Combine orders for many different titles and publishers, one invoice, one shipment
  • Easier to monitor performance (some wholesalers have electronic systems available or produce performance reports)
  • Offer value-added services
  • Large inventories
  • Timely service and competitive discounts
Disadvantages of jobbers
  • Concentrate on current materials (2-3 years old)
    o may not be able to acquire anything older
  • May be slower to ship than publisher if item is not in stock
  • Not as willing to supply difficult to obtain materials
Advantages of agents or dealers
  • More likely to have foreign publishers’ titles
  • More likely to go the extra mile to acquire hard-to-find items
  • More likely to have older materials in stock
  • Offer a more personalized service than a jobber
Disadvantages of agents or dealers
  • Often carry a limited line
  • Discounts not as high as publisher or jobber
Advantages of retailers
  • If item in stock extremely fast turnaround time
  • Can view expensive items before buying
Disadvantages of retailers
  • Often lower discounts
  • May have limited stock
  • May not place special orders
How do we choose a vendor?
  • We determine the qualities we want in a vendor, then monitor their performance
    o What is it you want?
    o Are they meeting your needs?
  • ALA Guide to Performance Evaluation of Library Materials Vendors (1988)
    o Identifies which areas of performance should be measured and how to measure them
    * Even after over twenty years, the guide is still relevant today
Qualities of a good vendor
  • Good inventory in stock
    o Academic stock would not be relevant to schools. Jobbers provide lists of publishers they carry. Will they carry your items?
  • Prompt order fulfillment
    o Vendors may not order enough copies, or wrong versions. They accept only 1-2% error rate on all orders.
  • Accurate order fulfillment
  • Reasonable and competitive discounts
  • High fill rate
    o How much of the order would they be able to provide you with immediately?
  • Extra services
There are some qualities you have to have faith in. It should be noted than some American publishers have Canadian distributors. Out of print has different meanings to different publishers. Between 75% and 85% of a order should be shipped within 2 months, although if promised to ship within 24 hours, they must commit.

Extra services
  • Cataloguing
    o Does the vendor provide?
  • Processed books or processing kits
  • Approval, standing order and lease plans
    o Does the vendor allow?
  • Electronic ordering and electronic invoicing
  • Tables of contents of books (for mounting on OPAC)
    o Part of analytics
  • Toll-free line
    o Or e-mail.